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Baker, F (2013) Housing and planning regulation England and Ireland. International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, 5(02), 118-36.

  • Type: Journal Article
  • Keywords: Centralisation; Decentralisation; England; Housing; Ireland; Planning; Public health
  • ISBN/ISSN: 1756-1450
  • URL: https://doi.org/10.1108/IJLBE-08-2012-0015
  • Abstract:
    Purpose The paper will aim to examine the contemporary origins and development of the planning system and housing regulation in England and Ireland. One objective is to broadly explicate how the regulation of housing in England began, with reference to Ireland, and its relationship with the planning system. The other is to outline the swing in England from a hotchpotch decentralised system to a centralised, and back again sharply to decentralised approach to planning and the provision for housing, a swing unparalleled in Ireland. Design/methodology/approach The approach is to consider the main influences on the regulation of planning and housing, with reference to historical, social and legal regulatory developments, and to broadly assess the role of centralised and decentralised systems. Findings The regulation of housing was an incidental product of the regulation of public health. The use of town and country planning principles could have assisted such regulation, but were unpopular until the development of a centralised system of planning in the 20th century. This has led to problems in Ireland for the delivery of local services. The change in England under the Localism Act to decentralized system is unlikely to achieve an effective use of local resources. It is unlikely that unwieldy new systems of decision-making and funding arrangements will improve the provision of housing for low incomes and the poor. A balance between the use of both systems is required. Originality/value This paper assesses the impact of social, historical, administrative and legal changes that have impacted on the progress of the relationship between planning and housing regulation in England and Ireland over the last two centuries until the present day.